Hormones Body Composition Fat loss

Hormones Body Composition Fat loss

Nutrition, exercise, normal physiological processes, and body composition are controlled with help of hormones, or chemical messengers that act on specific target organs and tissues to cause cellular responses. These responses are essential to help you gain muscle and lose fat.

Hormones Body Composition Fat loss

How hormones affect our body

As this topic is a too comprehensive with all the body chemistry involved, including cortisol, catecholamines and thyroid hormones, I like to focus in this article on insulin only.

The endocrine system and its glands that produce hormones that regulate metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, sexual function, reproduction, sleep, and mood, and more.

The effects of insulin…

  • Acts on the liver, fat tissue, and muscles and is one of many hormones required for human growth and development.
  • Regulates blood sugar levels. Secretes glucose from the blood stream and puts into cells where it is stored as energy. At the same time it acts like a satiety signal by releasing signals to your brain that you are fed.
  • As a storage hormone it not only stores sugar, it helps to store fat as well. When insulin is released, it activates an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase, which not only moves fat into fat cells for storage, but also simultaneously inhibits fat breakdown.
  • Insulin can increase your ability to add muscle mass with insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into muscle cells which enhances muscle protein synthesis by increasing the transport of amino acids into your muscles.
  • When insulin is released, you essentially go into “storage” and turn off your ability to use fat as a fuel. Insulin

 

Hormones Body Composition Fat loss

Hormones Body Composition Fat loss

  • Insulin levels raise the highest from high-carbohydrate meals.
  • The glycemic index, or the relative amount that a food raises your blood glucose, can predict your insulin response. The higher the glycemic index of the carbohydrate, the more it will raise insulin.
  • Usually an acute rise in insulin is normal and really not a problem. As your body handles it, the blood glucose and insulin will return to lower concentrations. It is a constant overload of high-carbohydrate meals, when your insulin levels will always be high and you are likely spending more time in fat-storing mode than fat-burning mode.
  • If this pattern continues for long periods of time, you might become insulin resistant and your cells don’t respond to the insulin so well. The blood sugar is not as well controlled and your body is forced to produce more and more insulin to have the same impact on reducing your blood glucose levels.
  • To keep your insulin levels stable consume most of your carbohydrates with a low glycemic index like vegetables and whole grains. These foods don’t raise your blood glucose as much as sweets, some breads, or juice, which have high glycemic index values.

As protein and fat don’t influence insulin to the same extent as carbohydrates, it might be beneficial to think about building your typical meal with focus on protein first, good-quality fats and vegetables next, and then other low glycemic index carbohydrates.